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On the Level (aka New Jack City)

So, contrary to our assumptions, getting the house shored (leveled) turned out to affordable — if painful. Although not in our budget, we decided this is one of those things that is just ‘the right thing to do’ and that this was the right time to do it. Once we install tile in the bathroom there is no going back and leveling the house.

On Wednesday, the crew from Davie Shoring showed up. The amazing thing about watching this team work is the fact that what they did is so elementary. That is not to say it is easy or doesn’t take skill. It is just that everything about what they did was straight out of a 7th grade physics text book. The art and finesse came in as they worked their way through the nuances of this particular house and its unique challenges.

What they were facing: The weight of this two story house is carried by the piers around the outside of the house (front, back, and two sides) as well as by a line of piers down the center of the building. The house has two chimneys  (two stories and double sided) which have settled — but have settled less than the two sides of the house. At first blush, what needed to happen was obvious: the left and right side of the house needed to be raised back to level. A closer look, however, revealed that the front of the house was actually the high point. But, we couldn’t raise the sides up to the level of the front of the house because the chimneys were about 2″ lower than the front of the house. Raising the chimneys while possible was off the table for our budget and would damage the roof and . . . .

We discussed leaving the front of the house where it is (it has a chain wall which might be best left alone) and level the sides to the level of the chimneys.

Doug, the supervisor on the job, wasn’t too happy with that idea. He was hired to level the house and he wanted it level. So he decided to have the crew do some exploration under the front of the house. If he could sneak the front of the house down near the level of the chimneys, then he could get everything else to work out.

Within a couple minutes, the team had jacks under the front of the house and were removing coursing of brick. They were able to drop the front of the house about an inch and a half. At that point they knew they could make the rest of the numbers work and were ready to work on the sides. Because of the size of the house, they used two bottle jacks between each set of piers.

Daylight is visible as the house hovers above the piers

When they were ready to lift the house, each man worked two jacks and they counted the pumps as they raised the house to ensure an even lift and to minimize damage to the interior finishes. Watching this was my favorite part of the operation. They knew to a fairly accurate degree how many pumps it would take to move the house 5/8″ or 1-1/8″.

leveling historic home with bottle jacks

Working in unison to raise Ursulines house.

As they worked their way around the house, they checked their progress with a digital version of a water level. By the end of the day, the house was once again level (mostly — there were certain compromises that one has to make with old houses that are set in their ways). The crew shimmed and pinned the house so they could return in the morning and rebuild the piers and chain wall.

The old sill floats above the pier during the jacking

One coursing of brick removed while the house is leveled

Before the work started, I was afraid that I we would spend the money for the leveling and it wouldn’t make much of a difference. Once they started working and the house began creaking and moaning and plaster began to crack I wanted to stop them and send everyone home. But by the end of the day I could not have been happier.

Remember the window that started it all? The one that was so out of plumb that we couldn’t repair the sash without ruining it?

The proof is in the pudding:

Level on window after the shoring

Level in the front window after the shoring of the house

It is a bit hard to see in the image above, but if you look closely at the apron of the window you will see a diagonal pencil line. That was the line that the carpenter put there using a level before the house was shored. That is how far off of level this window was. Seeing that little bubble nestled in between the two lines of that glass tube confirmed that we made the right decision and that we had a damn good team working with us. Thanks guys!

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